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After news broke that Brit’s fiancé, Jason Trawick, would become co-conservator over her personal decisions as a means to lock down the X Factor contract, a lot of people turned a blind eye.

And a lot didn’t.

Eonline.com asked several lawyers with no involvement in the conservatorship to weigh in.

“It makes a lot of sense to me that [Britney’s counsel] is requesting her fiancé to be appointed a co-conservator,” L.A.-based attorney Allie Weinstein, whose past clients have included Lindsay Lohan and Brooke Mueller, tells E! News.

“It’s only practical that your future spouse—who loves you, knows your daily routine, and has your best interests in mind—have authority to make personal decisions.”

She explains that a conservatorship over an estate, which Jamie Spears has, is different from the personal conservatorship that Jason is petitioning to be a part of.

“If Trawick is appointed co-conservator of Britney’s person, he, together with Britney, will decide all of her personal decisions, including whether she can leave the state and enter into contracts,” Weinstein says. “But because [his petition] does not request that he be appointed conservator of her estate, he will not have the authority to make decisions regarding her financial matters, like paying bills and collecting her income.”

What happens if their marriage doesn’t end up happily ever after? Family law attorney Lisa Helfend Meyer says Jason probably wouldn’t request to be a co-conservator if all wasn’t fine and dandy.

“If it wasn’t stable, the relationship and her mental health, I don’t think anyone would be doing this,” Meyers says. “This is probably the first step towards eventually getting rid of the conservatorship. You want to see them get married and maintain stability and things are going well. Maybe someone is counseling them, saying do things in baby steps.”

Either way, Meyers says, she speculates that this could very well be a point of transition for Britney, one that brings her closer to regaining legal responsibility for her life and money.

“There’s been no incidents that at least the public is aware of in a few years, so why does she still need a conservatorship?” Meyer questions. “I see her in public and she seems better than a majority of the parents out there— what does she need a conservator for?”

Great question. And, how does adding a conservator make it a step closer for Britney regaining complete control?

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