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Which artist careers died and which artist careers reached heights because streaming era? How did the streaming era affected the music industry?


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Ever since 2011, buying a single or album on a streaming service you are subscribed to pay monthly on a app has been a much more preferred alternative to going to a physical store, buying a CD/Vinyl/Cassette of a album and playing it on your Cassette or CD player or record player. The streaming era (2011-   ) is now a force, that has changed the Music Industry in tens of ways, artist don't have to worry of getting a No.1 when they're fandoms can hold streaming parties to get the song to skyrocket on the chart...THEN have a freefall on the charts. Its a common thing to see nowadays, Fan-fueled No.1 hits. Its hard these days to see consistent hits on the charts like Blinding lights, dont start now or WAP. People dont have to buy albums anymore, as they can buy and stream a single and get the satisfaction they need. Thats why we see prominent stars these days, with staggering single singles, but mediocre album sales.

So with the discussion of streaming era being a negative or positive, i wanted to ask everyone

Which artist do you think the streaming era killed, or caused the decline of their sales. To me, the streaming era killed the more older acts who used to be very powerful pure album sellers like Britney, Mariah Carey and Madonna, i think for these artist, the streaming era was a bad thing for them.

But what artist do you think survived this streaming era, and in fact, even used it as their weapon to further their success more?

I think this video also really gives a perfect retrospect into how the streaming industry affected the music industry:

     spotify-brands-logo-34.png

What do you guys think? Lemme know :sendinglove_kissing_heart_love_blowing:Streaming-music-services.jpg

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Dem chickens is ash, and im lotion :queenflopga:

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Eminem, without a doubt. He still pulls in big numbers. In France, Mylène Farmer still sells quite a lot. Céline Dion too (in France, the US and the rest of the world). That said, I'm mostly worried about new, unknown or lesser known indie acts really trying to make it.

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One major effect of streaming is that it has reduced a lot of the barriers to entry for new artists. 10 years ago, you would need connections within the industry to find you or get you a shot just to talk to a record label, you would need to perform for the record label and hope that they are interested, get a record contract, record in a professional studio, get a bunch of fees taken out for the contract, producers, marketing, etc. Now, you can write, record, and produce your own music, put it on streaming, and anyone can listen to it. No record label, producer, contracts, promo, etc. needed.

I believe this is why certain music artists don't dominate as much or for as long as they used to. You aren't stuck listening to the same old artists on the radio, tv, charts, etc. Now, you can listen to any music you want, no matter how old, new, obscure, or popular. You aren't stuck listening only to the albums you've bought or music that is playing on the radio. You aren't dependent on the release schedules of record labels. You don't need to spend $10 just to try out a new album that you might not like. If you don't like a song or album, you don't need to listen to it. It makes the industry more competitive but also has made it easier than ever for artists to find success imo.

I also think it has led to a surge of diversity and creativity in music. Instead of pop music being dominated by the same artists who are all following the same few trends or few genres of  music, there are now so many artists fusing genres and creating different types of music.

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5 minutes ago, Urbanney said:

One major effect of streaming is that it has reduced a lot of the barriers to entry for new artists. 10 years ago, you would need connections within the industry to find you or get you a shot just to talk to a record label, you would need to perform for the record label and hope that they are interested, get a record contract, record in a professional studio, get a bunch of fees taken out for the contract, producers, marketing, etc. Now, you can write, record, and produce your own music, put it on streaming, and anyone can listen to it. No record label, producer, contracts, promo, etc. needed.

I believe this is why certain music artists don't dominate as much or for as long as they used to. You aren't stuck listening to the same old artists on the radio, tv, charts, etc. Now, you can listen to any music you want, no matter how old, new, obscure, or popular. You aren't stuck listening only to the albums you've bought or music that is playing on the radio. You aren't dependent on the release schedules of record labels. You don't need to spend $10 just to try out a new album that you might not like. If you don't like a song or album, you don't need to listen to it. It makes the industry more competitive but also has made it easier than ever for artists to find success imo.

I also think it has led to a surge of diversity and creativity in music. Instead of pop music being dominated by the same artists who are all following the same few trends or few genres of  music, there are now so many artists fusing genres and creating different types of music.

So u have taken the positive side of streaming right?

So if we look at the negative points, has the streaming era done more good, or more bad?

Dem chickens is ash, and im lotion :queenflopga:

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23 minutes ago, Blackout2006 said:

So u have taken the positive side of streaming right?

So if we look at the negative points, has the streaming era done more good, or more bad?

Mostly only good imo. It's lowkey the equivalent to "more power to the people" but for the music industry. Instead of relying on music labels and old white male execs to dictate your success, everyone has a chance at creating and sharing whatever they want. More music, more creativity, more diversity, more talent.

Only downside I've seen is that artists don't seem to put as much effort into the whole of their artistry anymore. For example, Britney used to have entire eras meticulously planned out from the music, to her videos, to her styling and photoshoots, to her promo schedules, etc. She knew how to make great music, put on exceptional performances that included both dancing, passion, and stage presence. Themes and visual styling (like the Circus theme) would be carried out across the music, album photoshoots, performances, and videos. Singles and albums were released strategically for success.

Now, music is more disposable and is replaced more quickly, so it seems artists put less effort into creating these entire eras which is unfortunate, imo, since these eras are really creative, entertaining, and impressive. 

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1 hour ago, Urbanney said:

One major effect of streaming is that it has reduced a lot of the barriers to entry for new artists. 10 years ago, you would need connections within the industry to find you or get you a shot just to talk to a record label, you would need to perform for the record label and hope that they are interested, get a record contract, record in a professional studio, get a bunch of fees taken out for the contract, producers, marketing, etc. Now, you can write, record, and produce your own music, put it on streaming, and anyone can listen to it. No record label, producer, contracts, promo, etc. needed.

In a way,  yes, it makes it easier for new, indie artists. As you put it: "Now, you can write, record, and produce your own music, put it on streaming, and anyone can listen to it. No record label, producer, contracts, promo, etc. needed."

But on the other hand, it makes it much harder in the sense there are now tens and tens of thousands of talented indie artists trying to make it. The Drooble community, for instance, now has over 83,000 artists!!! Tons and tons and tons of weekly releases by bucketloads of unknown/lesser known indie acts + bigger stars. The way I see it, it makes it even more difficult to break the ice and make it. And promo is crucial for big success, true superstardom.

Mylène Farmer & Laurent Boutonnat recently produced a talented new singer named Julia (she's 18). After four singles and music videos released over two years, they released a promo single and her first LP, Passe... comme tu sais, last June. The LP only sold about 2,000 units and disappeared from the charts after three weeks... For a Sony artist produced by two legends of French music, yes, that's a huge flop. Granted, Farmer, Boutonnat and SMART/Sony Music France chose to spend as little as possible, promo was limited, but there was still some promo and a buzz among Farmer's fans. If Julia could flop that way, imagine how it must be for many indie acts left on their own...



 

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Well the streaming era actually started in 2014 but in my opinion it’s a really negative thing. I love that it’s cheap and all but it really ruined the music industry and now artists debut at number one with 100k units only

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I understand that streaming era and of getting with the times. In my eyes it has more of a negative an positive effects. The positive artist who are struggling are “making” sales with steaming which is helping them to make more money and get certified plaques... example fifth harmony’s first album was considered a flop on pure sales but when streaming came in they were certified platinum. The negative is that all the achievement that other artists with pure sales are being easily beaten by streaming. Example Despacito and old town road being at number one for 16 and 20 weeks. When Mariah had own sweet day at number one for 16 weeks on pure sales. i feel like back in the 90’s and early 00’s their was crappy artist that no one listen to but now the crappy artist are the ones dominating. (Don’t @ me) city girls, 69, lil Nas X. Streaming will continue to bring on these type of artists that the music is trash but people will still keep listening... smh

 tenor.gif

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I mean Madonna, Katy, Britney and a few other pop girls haven't exactly adapted to the streaming era, but lack of radio support is also a big factor in why some of their newer songs aren't successful. I hate streaming though; it's led to some quick lil' singles with no staying power.

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31 minutes ago, alexxxx said:

Well the streaming era actually started in 2014 but in my opinion it’s a really negative thing. I love that it’s cheap and all but it really ruined the music industry and now artists debut at number one with 100k units only

Tea honestly, LMBO

Its crazy to in order to get a No.1 album, you had to have 400k+ sales in your first week to get the top spot, Blackout went No.2 despite selling 290k copies (even though it didnt go No.1 because of Billboards ****ty last minute-rule change) and now we are having flopstars with a huge streaming base debuting at No.1 selling 50k copies only :orangu_orangutan_ape:

Dem chickens is ash, and im lotion :queenflopga:

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2 minutes ago, Blackout2006 said:

Tea honestly, LMBO

Its crazy to in order to get a No.1 album, you had to have 400k+ sales in your first week to get the top spot, Blackout went No.2 despite selling 290k copies (even though it didnt go No.1 because of Billboards ****ty last minute-rule change) and now we are having flopstars with a huge streaming base debuting at No.1 selling 50k copies only :orangu_orangutan_ape:

Male rappers dominate streaming platforms and they always debut at number one with 80K units (with 7k ONLY being pure sales):katyclown_makeup_mess_pie_meme_smile:

it’s just so annoying how easy it is to get a number one album now compared to pre-streaming. At least with singles it’s a bit harder.

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33 minutes ago, K-man said:

I understand that streaming era and of getting with the times. In my eyes it has more of a negative an positive effects. The positive artist who are struggling are “making” sales with steaming which is helping them to make more money and get certified plaques... example fifth harmony’s first album was considered a flop on pure sales but when streaming came in they were certified platinum. The negative is that all the achievement that other artists with pure sales are being easily beaten by streaming. Example Despacito and old town road being at number one for 16 and 20 weeks. When Mariah had own sweet day at number one for 16 weeks on pure sales. i feel like back in the 90’s and early 00’s their was crappy artist that no one listen to but now the crappy artist are the ones dominating. (Don’t @ me) city girls, 69, lil Nas X. Streaming will continue to bring on these type of artists that the music is trash but people will still keep listening... smh

 tenor.gif

Preach!

One thing streaming really did hit hard with was competition and sales. These days you have songs go no.1 only because fans were holding streaming parties, buying 5 digital copies of the song through different music services, and streaming songs endlessly through loops. Its crazy to think how Someday managed to hold a No.1 for 16 weeks back in 1995, when you had to find new audience for them to buy yr single in order for it to stay No.1 for longer. I like Lil Nas X but, his achievement didnt feel you know as big of a deal as Someday because it was able to hold the record by the help of streaming. There are still good artist tho and Lil Nas X isnt bad honestly, thankfully, even if album sales arent as big as they were, we still have album sales of 4-7 million.

Dem chickens is ash, and im lotion :queenflopga:

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4 minutes ago, alexxxx said:

Male rappers dominate streaming platforms and they always debut at number one with 80K units (with 7k ONLY being pure sales):katyclown_makeup_mess_pie_meme_smile:

it’s just so annoying how easy it is to get a number one album now compared to pre-streaming. At least with singles it’s a bit harder.

Oh yes, boy they do truly do. Just put out one trash song and BOOM! those rappers have a billion streams

And to think 10 years ago, 80k was below flop standards for albums that would sell 300k-900k in one week :katyclown_makeup_mess_pie_meme_smile:

Dem chickens is ash, and im lotion :queenflopga:

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3 hours ago, Urbanney said:

Mostly only good imo. It's lowkey the equivalent to "more power to the people" but for the music industry. Instead of relying on music labels and old white male execs to dictate your success, everyone has a chance at creating and sharing whatever they want. More music, more creativity, more diversity, more talent.

Only downside I've seen is that artists don't seem to put as much effort into the whole of their artistry anymore. For example, Britney used to have entire eras meticulously planned out from the music, to her videos, to her styling and photoshoots, to her promo schedules, etc. She knew how to make great music, put on exceptional performances that included both dancing, passion, and stage presence. Themes and visual styling (like the Circus theme) would be carried out across the music, album photoshoots, performances, and videos. Singles and albums were released strategically for success.

Now, music is more disposable and is replaced more quickly, so it seems artists put less effort into creating these entire eras which is unfortunate, imo, since these eras are really creative, entertaining, and impressive. 

The problem is that on these small indie/folk artist are not getting good amount of money. Streaming services only charge 12-50 dollars per a 1000 streams! so if a song is getting 5k streams, it still isnt enough money for a person

Dem chickens is ash, and im lotion :queenflopga:

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55 minutes ago, Invitation said:

Anyone doing trap music reached new heights in streaming era.

For sure! Rap/Trap is one of the easiest beats to make, thats why its still in high demand.

Dem chickens is ash, and im lotion :queenflopga:

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I think in terms of careers dying because of the streaming era Cheryl Cole is a good example: She had been at the top for 12 years (2002-2014) but as soon as streaming became a thing she started tanking, it also could be due to the fact that she had a 3 year hiatus but even then her last single before the hiatus only went #70 (her first single in the streaming era).

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12 hours ago, bliss said:

I think in terms of careers dying because of the streaming era Cheryl Cole is a good example: She had been at the top for 12 years (2002-2014) but as soon as streaming became a thing she started tanking, it also could be due to the fact that she had a 3 year hiatus but even then her last single before the hiatus only went #70 (her first single in the streaming era).

yeah, the streaming era really did kill artist who were very popular. i think the only artist that survived the streaming era is Ariana Grande

Dem chickens is ash, and im lotion :queenflopga:

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