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#FREEBRITNEY | Britney’s Gram Received Worrying Voicemail Regarding Britney


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I thought Britney's grandma had received a worrying voicemail 

Do you guys remember that blind item from August last year?  This permanent A list "singer" is rebelling in one of the only ways she can. She has been refusing to take her medication which has

Her case is a public case in California's public records. Ever since the beginning she has tried according to these official records to fight the conservatorship at least 7 times, but was denied by th

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aww she's so sweet. i hope they'll collab one day. i actually kinda like her music :hugs: collabing with Cardi would definitely be better than with Nicki tbh because Nicki kinda collaborates with literally everyone now. There's nothing special about her anymore. :brityawning: and Britney's done that before so.. :nonoNO:

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12 minutes ago, alienatedNey said:

aww she's so sweet. i hope they'll collab one day. i actually kinda like her music :hugs: collabing with Cardi would definitely be better than with Nicki tbh because Nicki kinda collaborates with literally everyone now. There's nothing special about her anymore. :brityawning: and Britney's done that before so.. :nonoNO:

But Cardi has been working with literally everyone, too.  It’s been less than two years since she blew up, and she’s already been on so many songs.  I wouldn’t be opposed to a collab with Cardi, but I’d prefer a proper Nicki collab. :mhm: Nicki has way more talent, and her music is better. 

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There are various types of conservatorships depending on the needs of the conservatee: 


1. Probate Conservatorships
These conservatorships are based on the laws in the California Probate Code. They are the most common type of conservatorship. Probate conservatorships can be:

General Conservatorships — conservatorships of adults who cannot take care of themselves or their finances. These conservatees are often elderly people, but can also be younger people who have been seriously impaired, like in a car accident, for example.

Limited Conservatorships — conservatorships of adults with developmental disabilities who cannot fully care for themselves or their finances. Conservatees in limited conservatorships do not need the higher level of care or help that conservatees in general conservatorships need.

When a conservatorship is needed right away, the court may appoint a temporary conservator until a general conservator can be appointed. The request must be filed as part of a general conservatorship case, and can be filed either at the same time or soon after the general conservatorship case is opened with the court. The main duties of a temporary conservator are arranging for the temporary care, protection, and support of the conservatee, and protecting the conservatee’s finances and property.

2. Lanterman-Petris-Short (LPS) Conservatorships
LPS conservatorships are used to care for adults with serious mental health illnesses who need special care. These conservatorships are used for people who usually need very restrictive living arrangements (like living in locked facilities) and require extensive mental health treatment (like very powerful drugs to control behavior). Conservatees in LPS conservatorships cannot or will not agree to the special living arrangements or treatment on their own. LPS conservatorships must be started by a local government agency. If you believe that this is the type of help the adult needs, contact your local county Public Guardian or Public Conservator. The information on this Online Self-Help Center does not apply to LPS conservatorships.

 

 

THEN

Types of Probate Conservators

The probate court can appoint a conservator of the person, a conservator of the estate, or both, depending on the needs of the conservatee.

A conservator of the person cares for and protects a person when the judge decides that the person cannot do it. The conservator is responsible for making sure that the conservatee has proper food, clothing, shelter, and health care. Depending on the conservatee’s ability to understand and make decisions, the conservator may need to make important medical choices for him or her.

A conservator of the estate handles the conservatee’s financial matters — like paying bills and collecting a person’s income — if the judge decides the conservatee cannot do it.

Being appointed conservator of the person does NOT automatically make that person the conservator of the estate. If someone wants to be conservator of both, the person and the estate, he or she must petition to be appointed as both. If someone is a conservator of the person and later decides that he or she needs to be appointed as conservator of the estate, he or she can file a new petition for conservatorship and, this time, request to be appointed as conservator of the estate.

 

 

ALSO

 

The duties of a conservator of the person are to:

Arrange for the conservatee’s care and protection.

Decide where the conservatee will live.

Make arrangements for the conservatee’s:

Meals,

Health care,

Clothing,

Personal care,

Housekeeping,

Transportation,

Shelter,

Recreation, and

Well-being.

Get approval from the court for certain decisions about the conservatee’s health care or living arrangements.

Report to the court on the conservatee’s current status.

 

The duties of a conservator of the estate are to:

Manage the conservatee’s finances.

Locate and take control of all assets.

Collect the conservatee’s income.

Make a budget to show what the conservatee can afford.

Pay the conservatee’s bills.

Responsibly invest the conservatee’s money.

Protect the conservatee’s assets.

Account to the court and to the conservatee for the management of the conservatee’s assets.

 

 

 

FINALLY

A conservatorship is usually a permanent arrangement. But, in certain cases, a conservatorship may be ended or the conservator may be changed.

The conservatee becomes able to handle his or her own affairs
Someone may have a conservator while he or she recovers from a physical or mental condition that is temporarily disabling. For example, the conservatee may have been in a serious car accident and be unable to handle his or her personal affairs or finances. After rehabilitation, the conservatee may recover and be able to take care of things again.

In these cases, the conservatee, the conservator, a relative or friend of the conservatee, or some other interested person can ask the court to end the conservatorship. The court may ask the court investigator to evaluate the case and the conservatee’s condition to see if the conservatorship should be ended. If the judge ends the conservatorship, the conservator will be released from his or her duties.

The conservatee doesn’t have any more assets
Sometimes all of the conservatees assets will be spent for his or her care. Without assets there may no longer be a need for a conservatorship of the estate. The conservatorship of the person continues if necessary.

The conservatee dies
The conservatorship ends when the conservatee dies. But the court will not automatically release the conservator from his or her duties and close the conservatorship until the conservator takes certain actions to finish the case.

The court removes the conservator
The court may remove a conservator who is not doing the job or is not able to do it, and then appoint a new conservator. The conservatee or any of his or her relatives or friends may ask the court to remove and replace the conservator. If the conservatee makes the request and does not have his or her own lawyer, the judge will generally appoint one to file the petition for the conservatee.

The conservator dies
If the conservator dies, a relative, friend, or the conservator’s executor (the personal representative of his or her estate) should let the court know. If there is an estate conservatorship, the conservator’s executor or attorney may be required to file a final account of the conservatee’s financial affairs, or another conservator may be required for this purpose.

The conservator resigns
If the conservator becomes ill or cannot continue serving as a conservator for some other reason, the conservator can file a petition asking the court to accept his or her resignation. Until (and unless) the court accepts the resignation, the conservator is still fully responsible as conservator.

If the court accepts the resignation, the judge may ask the former conservator to help find someone else to replace him or her. If there is no one suitable, the Public Guardian or a professional fiduciary may be appointed.

When a conservator is removed or resigns, or the conservatorship ends, the conservator will be released from his or her duties, but only after he or she wraps things up and provides the court the needed information or documents to either transfer the case to a new conservator or end the conservatorship. For conservatorships of the estate, the conservator will have to turn in a final accounting.

 

ON TO RIGHTS OF THE CONSERVATEE

Rights Retained by a Conserved Person – A “Conservatorship of the Person” is to protect someone who cannot properly provide for his or her own personal needs for physical health, medical care, food, clothing, or shelter. The court appointed Conservator – often a family member or the local public guardian — is granted powers over the care, custody and control of the conservatee (i.e., the conserved person).

The conservatee, however, still retains important rights, including the right to receive visitors, telephone calls and personal mail, unless personally limited by court order, and other personal rights. Moreover, the conservator is required to make sure that the place selected for the conservatee to live is the “least restrictive” appropriate alternative that is available and necessary to meet the conservatee’s needs.

A conserved person can only be denied contact with specific persons when a court order specifically authorizes such restrictions; not simply at the conservator’s discretion. The conservator must either obtain a restraining order against or must modify the conservatorship order to be allowed to prevent contacts with a certain person.

In some conservatorships, the conservator’s duty to protect a vulnerable conservatee against predators conflicts with the conservatee’s retained right to regarding social contacts. There are instances when the conservator legitimately seeks to prevent certain family or friends from contacting the conservatee. There are other instances where the conservator has gone too far.

Recent cases involving family members have drawn publicity to abuses by conservators who unjustly denied family visitations. The family members complained they were even threatened with legal action by the conservator should they persist, and were told to go away by the police. In effect, the family members had no readily available way to regain access to the conservatee.

California law now expressly states that the conservatee retains important rights. Moreover a, “Notice of the Conservatee’s Rights” must be served on certain relatives of the conserved person and to be posted at a skilled nursing home.

Nursing homes may not follow a conservator’s instruction to restrict visitors, phone calls or mail from specified individuals or groups without a court order specifically authorizing the same.

If the conservatee’s retained basic rights are violated, the conservatee and or family may petition the court to replace the conservator. Otherwise, the conservatee can tell the Court Investigator, who reports to the court once a year, that a serious problem exists.

The foregoing, of course, highlights why everyone should use their Advance Health Care Directive to nominate whom they would prefer to act as their conservator, with alternative nominations named, in the event one is needed.

 

 

 

IMPORTANT READ TO BE INFORMED ABOUT THE NATURE OF CONSERVATORSHIP

Which type is Britney's?

 

https://www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp-conservatorship.htm

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IMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO ASK:

Is Britney's conservatorship of the person or the estate or both?

If it's of the estate, then by ending it, will Britney be able to handle her own finances?

Does Britney want to handle her own finances?

If it's of the person, then has Britney been able to take care of herself and others?

 

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3 hours ago, Nels64 said:

12ish hours y’all 

you made me laugh lol it's gonna be such a long day. it will be 10pm in my country though...i will have to read yall final thoughts on it on saturday morning and it will be a nightmare cos y'all write 30 pages a day!:jlostare:

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Please read read read my thread about the nature of Conservatorship before we decide to "free Britney" then answer these questions:

Is Britney's conservatorship of the person or the estate or both?

If it's of the estate, then by ending it, will Britney be able to handle her own finances?

Does Britney want to handle her own finances?

If it's of the person, then has Britney been able to take care of herself and others?

 

 

Personally, I can't say I'm against or pro Conservatorship because we don't know anything regarding her actual situation. Appearances and candids and work out videos here and there are not informed enough for us to assess her situation.

It depends on the judge, the Court Investigator and Britney herself to get her out of the conservatorship. If she indeed wants out, she can. The Court Investigator is the key person to inform the judge regarding whether to end the conservatorship or not.

Do we know which type of Conservatorship she has?

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10 minutes ago, Kiey said:

IMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO ASK:

Is Britney's conservatorship of the person or the estate or both?

If it's of the estate, then by ending it, will Britney be able to handle her own finances?

Does Britney want to handle her own finances?

If it's of the person, then has Britney been able to take care of herself and others?

 

 

Britney's conservatorship is both of the person and of the estate. There's a lot of articles and documents about that and that's the reason why her life's controlled to even the most basic stuff like driving or owning a cellphone.

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3 minutes ago, land said:

 

Britney's conservatorship is both of the person and of the estate. There's a lot of articles and documents about that and that's the reason why her life's controlled to even the most basic stuff like driving or owning a cellphone.

Does anyone have an actual file of the terms of her conservatorship? I want to read but can't be able to find.

But if she's so restricted to that degree, it's because the court orders it. Which means there's something seriously wrong going on. If she really hates it, she can always notify the Court Investigator or ask someone to do it on her behalf if she feels violated or abused.

 

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At this point, I can't say I'm pro or against it.

There's so much the fans don't know.

Hearsays and "sources" are not valid for us to be advocating and protesting.

But I think it can be healthy in a way because the support can make the judge and investigator be very careful in their decision making.

 I don't think it's right of the fans to pry into her private personal information tho so the fans need to do it in a healthy, non-evasive way.

 

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