Lady Gaga Pens Essay For Harper’s Bazaar About Being A Woman In 2016

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"Joanne was my hope and my faith."

Lady Gaga took a break from the Joanne promotional tour to energize then revitalize the American people during last week's surprising political upset. We're now living in a country where Donald Trump is our President-elect, and for millions of women that thought is sickening, especially taking into account his pro-life stance and repulsive rhetoric.

Gaga wrote an essay in Harper's Bazaar about what it means to be a woman in today's day and age, including how her aunt Joanne remains a prideful inspiration.

"Being a lady today means being a fighter," she writes. "It means being a survivor. It means letting yourself be vulnerable and acknowledging your shame or that you're sad or you're angry. It takes great strength to do that. Before I made Joanne, I took some time off. I made music with Tony Bennett. I did "Til It Happens to You" with Diane Warren. But I was able to get off the train of endless work I'd been on, which was quite abusive to my body and my mind, and have some silence and some space around me. I wanted to experience music again the way I did when I was younger, when I just had to make it, instead of worrying what everybody thinks or being obsessed with things that aren't important."

She adds: "Fame is the best drug that's ever existed. But once you realize who you are and what you care about, that need for more, more, more just goes away. What matters is that I have a great family, I work hard, I take care of those around me, I provide jobs for people I love very much, and I make music that I hope sends a good message into the world. I turned 30 this year, and I'm a fully formed woman. I have a clear perspective on what I want. That, for me, is success. I want to be somebody who is fighting for what's true—not for more attention, more fame, more accolades."

Gaga also touches on Donald Trump.

"To me, Joanne was my hope and my faith. I always felt that I had somebody looking out for me, and I looked to her to protect me. As I've gotten older, I've also really looked to her to help understand myself. I thought about Joanne as I was watching the news during the election about the scandal surrounding the Access Hollywood tape. Here we were, in 2016, and the fact that the sort of language that was being used to talk about women was everywhere—on TV, in politics—was eye-opening. I felt depressed and hurt by it because that's what that kind of language does. Then I watched our incredible first lady, Michelle Obama, talk in New Hampshire about how hurt she felt seeing it too. She talked about how women are often afraid to say anything because we're worried that we will appear weak—that we'll be told we're being over-the-top, dramatic, emotional. But we're not. We're fighting for our lives."

Read the entire essay here.

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