Iggy Azalea Talks Plastic Surgery To Seventeen Magazine

Iggy Azalea Talks Plastic Surgery To Seventeen Magazine

All around the world, Pretty Girls?

Iggy Azalea opens up about her “emotional journey” getting plastic surgery to change the way she looks and curb her insecurities – a pressing issue since her appearance at the Billboard Music Awards in May when she showed up looking unfamiliar.

“I’m not denying it. Denying it is lame,” Azalea says in the new issue of Seventeen magazine, and also admits she had breast implants in the past. “I don’t think you should be ashamed if you made a change to yourself, which is why I’ve spoken about the changes I’ve made, like with my breasts.”

The “Problem” rapper says to weigh your options and not rush it – make sure it’s right for you – and do your research. “Your perception of yourself can change a lot over time,” she explains, “so I think it’s important to wait and make sure it’s the right choice. “I read a lot about nose jobs online. Some women are really happy they got them, and some women changed their noses when they were younger, and when they got older they wished they didn’t.”

Iggy Azalea Talks Plastic Surgery To Seventeen Magazine

Fans also speculate she’s had procedures to enhance her butt and refine her chin.

“Plastic surgery is an emotional journey,” Iggy says. “It’s no easy feat to live with your flaws and accept yourself—and it’s no easy feat to change yourself. Either way you look at it, it’s a tough journey. There are things that I didn’t like about myself that I changed through surgery. There are other things I dislike but I’ve learned to accept.”

What’s interesting about her outlook is it’s perceived through the eyes of celebrity. If Azalea was never rich and famous, or wanted to achieve stardom in the first place, would she still go through the “emotional journey” to conquer her insecurities? Or would she have accepted herself as is? Dealing with persistent online scrutiny might have taken its toll on Azalea, and if that’s the case we’d like to offer a hug, because no individual should penetrate your soul to that extent. If she genuinely, stardom and finances aside, would get plastic surgery because she knew improving her looks could authentically better herself as an individual and not feed into the ego, then more power to her. We’re not sure her advocacy and openness to plastic surgery in a magazine aimed at teenagers is ideal, but her honesty is commendable.

“It’s important to remember you can’t change everything,” says Iggy. “You can never be perfect.”