Diplo Can’t Stop Talking About Taylor Swift, Resurrects the Debate Surrounding Online Hate


When prompted by the interviewer (who just “had to ask”), Diplo opened up about Lorde mocking the size of his manhood – which was a “tongue-in-cheek joke”, actually – and the repercussions of mocking Queen of the Swifties online:

Like, Taylor Swift fans are really crazy. They threatened to murder me and stuff. It’s really bizarre, and disgusting. They’re the worst people in the world… They’re like “I wish your kids had Down syndrome.” They’re so evil. I dissed Lady Gaga before, and the gays were never even this mean. They’re funny. These people are like mean-spirited, evil human beings. I’m not a politician. I shouldn’t have to be under the microscope for people like that.

Well, it finally happened Little Monsters, there’s at least one person on the internet who thinks there’s a more vicious fan-base than you lot.

As much as Diplo seems to entirely miss the point of the level of criticism surrounding his comments to Taylor (which seemed to me to be focused more on sexism and body-shaming than Down syndrome), he does raise a good point that we seem to be discussing more and more. After Kelly Osbourne called out Gaga’s fans for similar behaviour back in 2013, it’s become less taboo for stars to highlight other fan-bases who are spreading hatred and vitriol on the internet. Whether it’s Beliebers, Directioners, or whatever crassly-named group of fans have the most power at any given time, it seems that one group or another is constantly under fire for making inexcusable statements (and even threats) behind the mask of social media.

Do you want my two cents? (You’re going to get it either way, so you may as well agree,) I think Diplo’s missed the point in more ways the one. It’s not about one particular group of fans, it’s not about whether the Swifties are worse than the Monsters or whether RiRi’s Navy can out-smack-talk the KatyKats, it’s all about online anonymity and the fact that people can hide behind faceless Twitter accounts and pseudonyms on Tumblr. That coupled with the illusions of closeness to and ownership over an artist that social media creates have lead to a climate where fans feel the need and ability to stand up for their favorite pop-stars, no holds barred. How we tackle that problem is a different question (which I don’t claim for a second to know the answer to) but it seems like pinpointing one group of fans and heralding them as worse than all the rest isn’t the most logical place to start.

You should check out the rest of the interview here, because aside from discussing Taylor Swift, Diplo actually has some really interesting things to say about the way people are making music in 2015. It’s a shame no one will be talking about that, since he decided to go nuclear on the Swifties instead.

What do YOU think? Is there too much hate online? Or do we have a right to stand up for our favorite artists?