Diane Warren Is Not Happy With Rita Ora


Speaking to HuffPost Entertainment, Warren had this to say about Ora's involvement with the track:

Gina, the director, wanted Rita to do it. Had I known there wouldn't be a lot of support, had I known she would have only tweeted about it once ... you know? She sang it great, but it's a little frustrating.

And elaborated:

"I have to be really honest, I don't want to be a jerk or anything, but had I known about this lack of support, there are other artists... I would have gone with... How on Earth are you not wanting to [promote it]... I don't get it. Everybody around me, we're all shocked."

Diane's confusion is understandable. Until the song received an Oscar nod no one had really heard of it, but the fact remains that it's an outstanding track, without a doubt the strongest offering we've yet to see from Ora. Her total failure to so much as acknowledge the song's existence is puzzling, especially considering that she'll be performing it at this month's Oscar ceremony, which is astronomical exposure for the British singer. It would, of course, be even bigger should anyone know the song beforehand.

Warren is responsible for six other Best Original Song nominations at the Academy Awards, including Aerosmith's "I Don't Want To Miss A Thing," and had this to say about her past efforts:

What all these other songs have in common, and what this should have in common with them, is that they were mass appeal hits. I could see that maybe you don't put it out as a single before the nomination, but when you're going to sing it to millions of people ... really? No video, no nothing. Really?

Clearly she's not thrilled.

The sad and simple truth is that Rita Ora is teetering dangerously on the edge of irrelevancy, largely due to having one of the most forgettable back-catalogues of any artist who's ever made it past their first album. Keeping Diane Warren on side would provide Rita with a powerful and talented ally who could potentially offer Ora tracks that actually put her on the map. As it is, the "I Will Never Let You Down" singer is known for nothing more than her own existence, a level of fame and success which is entirely unsustainable.

Warren wasn't entirely pessimistic, however, saying this about the song's chance of beating out stiff competition from the likes of John Legend:

It could go all the way. Literally, everything is so against it. All these people are doing videos and going out. You know what? I'm a scrappy little fighter. My song's a scrappy little fighter.

It's unclear if Rita Ora can salvage the situation but promoting the damn track would seem like a good place to start.

Do you agree with Diane? Is Rita sleeping on a hit?